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CURRENT THE ADVENTIST WORLD RADIO LISTENER NEWSLETTER September 1994

CURRENT THE ADVENTIST WORLD RADIO LISTENER NEWSLETTER September 1994
CURRENT THE ADVENTIST WORLD RADIO LISTENER NEWSLETTER September 1994
CURRENT
THE ADVENTIST WORLD RADIO LISTENER NEWSLETTER

Volume X
Issue Number 3
September 1994

The Russian Voice of Hope Adventist Media Centre was opened in 1992 in Tula. Programs in Russian are produced here and sent by land line to Radio Moscow for transmission.

Peter Kulakov. Away on study leave this year, his replacement is Daniel Reban.

It was a cold —20° C when AWR Board Chairman Kenneth Mittleider and President Walter Scragg threw the switch to inaugurate the first AWR broadcast from Russia. The date was 1 March 1992, and Adventist World Radio was the first religious broadcaster to begin utilizing government shortwave facilities in the former Soviet Union. It seemed a miracle that equipment once used to spread the Communist revolution would now be used to share the Good News of Jesus Christ.
Almost from the beginning, the Soviet Union was one of the most active of all international broadcasters. During the Tenth Anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution in 1927, foreign guests in Moscow were invited by the Soviet authorities to send messages in their own languages back to their home countries. This service ended when the celebration was over, but the experience encouraged the Communists to establish a permanent broadcast service in 1929, and by 1950 the Soviet Union was already broadcasting in 50 different languages and dialects. The BBC, in comparison, did not even begin their overseas service until 1952. AWR first started using a facility located near Novosibirsk in Siberia. The station was built in 1956, three years following Stalin's death, and consists of eighteen 100 kilowatt transmitters and numerous curtain antennas.
It could very well be that Stalin was involved in the planning of this station. It is located in a strategic position for broadcasting to both China and India.
With the help of the Russian Adventist Media Center Director, Peter Kulakov, AWR-Russia continued to grow. Broadcasts were added from stations located near Ekaterinburg, Samara, and Moscow. Land lines were installed from the Adventist Media Center in Tula, which is located about 200 km south of Moscow, to the main switching center in Moscow, located only a few hundred meters from Red Square.
The Adventist Media Center is a modern building which houses radio studios, administration for radio and television broadcasts, Bible correspondence school, the office for AWR—Russia. The "Voice of Hope" programs produced in Tula are broadcast on two national channels in Russia. These programs are heard via an extensive network of cable, FM, medium—wave,long-wave, and short-wave stations. A recent study in Russia by the BBC shows that AWR has become the most popular religious broadcaster among all international broadcasters.
Igor Revtov (left) is the coordinator for AWR—Russia. From his office in Tula, Igor manages the daily release of programs for the stations in Samara and Novosibirsk, During 1994, programming from Ekaterinburg and Moscow were transferred to AWR's new leased facility in Rimavská Sobota, Slovakia.
The current broadcast schedule for AWR-Russia includes programming in Mandarin, Korean, Hindi, and English for Asia, Arabic and English for the Middle East, and Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, and Spanish for northern Europe.

At work in a Russian Adventist Media Center studio is Pavel Trusuk, operator

Transmission lines march across the snow to the antenna fields of Novosibirsk.


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josef_zenchan

Author:josef_zenchan
Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem!
Behold, thy King cometh unto thee; He is the righteous Saviour, and He shall speak peace unto the heathen.

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